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11/01/2019

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Pinckney

1. Heid argues that handwriting exercises the brain and relieves stress better than typing words. It also boosts cognitive skills and lowers depression. I find the benefit of being to test higher the most supportive, as a test requires intense focus and high brain activity to complete.

2. In paragraph three " can lead to measurable physical and mental health benefits.", paragraph four " experts who study handwriting say there’s reason to believe something is lost when people abandon the pen for the keyboard.", paragraph six "Writing by hand may also improve a person’s memory for new information.", paragraph nine "which may facilitate better self-expression.", and paragraph ten "But the impersonal nature of keyboard-generated text may also, in some small way, be contributing to the observed toxicity.", his qualifications do not damage his argument because he is rounding them towards different types of audiences.

3. I can easily distinguish between Heid's own statements and his cited sources. The statement "And there’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate this form of therapy than typing." is typed after he cites evidence from other sources to make the claim.

4. On a standard schedule, I take notes with paper. And I do write notes on my class readings. However, I personally use a keyboard on my own time. After switching the use of technology for class use and paper for personal use I learned how effective paper was over digital notes. When writing I felt more mentally active and I remembered more rather than a few sentences I typed on a keyboard that stayed in my mind for a few hours and became a complete blur.

Noelle Whitener

1. In “Mightier than the sword: Markham Heid on the benefits of handwriting,” Heid believes that writing longhand has many advantages, including less stress, self-expression, reading and thinking skills, and being personal. The advantage that handwriting is more personal is the most persuasive. When people handwrite notes, it is more personal than typing notes on a computer. Most people would prefer a handwritten note over an email because the person really has to take the time to write out his or her thoughts.

2. Heid uses the words “may” and “possibly” a little too much when citing studies on the benefits of handwriting. In one instance he writes, “The fact that handwriting is a slower process than typing may be another perk, at least in some contents” (para. 7). He does this in hopes that he will not show his own opinion too boldly. However, using these words over and over again is confusing. It makes it look like he is noncommittal on the subject, making his point hard to understand. But, by citing experts on the subject, his argument that handwriting is more beneficial is strengthened.

3. Most of Heid’s argument is based on the sources he cites. He does not express his own opinion enough, and most of his words are not his. He writes, “The authors of that study say writing by hand may promote “deep encoding” of new information in ways that keyboard writing does not. And other researchers have argued that writing by hand promotes learning and cognitive development in ways keyboard writing can’t match” (para. 6). Heid uses too many sources and always goes back to the source when talking about the benefits of writing longhand. The article is good, full of information, but not enough of it is Heid’s. He solely cites other people to argue his point, and his argument could be more effective if he explained himself more.

4. I take my notes on paper in class. Sometimes I write in a journal at home. I hand-write birthday cards. I only use the computer for school assignments and typing emails. I retain a lot more information while writing on paper. I think of more information more while I am writing. For me, typing on a computer takes more time and is less efficient.

Meng

The article is not accessible to me. Do I have to pay for reading?

Resse

In the article “Bring Back Handwriting: It’s Good For Your Brain” the author Markham Heid argues that writing by hand has many advantages to one's mental and physical health. Over time many people have been depending on typing on the keyboard because it’s faster and more efficient. Heid wrote this article to show that handwriting is important and should not be forgotten. He had good points on how handwriting is beneficial such as lower stress, fewer depression symptoms to improve immune functions, and improve a person's memory. Handwriting is very important. It makes you feel connected to yourself or if you are writing a letter, it makes you feel connected to others.

3. It is easy to distinguish between Heid’s own statements and his other sources. He usually cites his sources to make his claim. As he wrote in the article “He says there’s also speculation that longhand note-taking can help people in certain situations form closer connections”. He cited the sources in the previous sentence. He uses many sources to inform the readers but does not give enough of his opinion in the article. His sources make his argument stronger and reliable.

4. In class I usually take notes with pen and paper. I learned that is more efficient for me and I remember more while I write it down rather than type it out. In the beginning of the school year, I used my laptop and realized I don't even look at my notes after I am done with the class. I prefer notes on pen and paper it's easier to study and memorize the information.

Eden Losycer

I have read some of the other comments on the questions regarding this blog. The responses to this blog were pretty good responding to the questions that were being asked. Here are some other questions you may want to answer if you want to read this blog in the future.

1. How well do the participants in these exchanges
summarize one another’s claims before making their own
responses?
2. How would you characterize any discussion?
3. Is there a true meeting of the minds or are writers sometimes
caricatured or treated as straw men?
4. How do these online discussions compare with the face to face discussions you have
in class?
5. What advantages does each offer?

Janine Dial

1. Some advantages Markham Heid describes are physical and mental health benefits, better memory encoding, and closer connections. Writing feelings down in a journal can help manage emotions instead of expressing emotions through text. Taking notes in class by hand is a way to process the lesson and remember it better than typing notes. When people send others handwritten letters, it is a meaningful gesture but when they send texts, it doesn’t produce the same effect because it isn’t as special.
I find the most persuasive advantage to be taking notes by hand instead of typing notes. I have personally found writing notes more beneficial to me than typing my notes on a computer. I remember what I learned when referring back to my handwritten notes, but can barely remember anything I typed on a computer.

2. -”There’s evidence that people may in some cases lose out when they abandon handwriting for keyboard-generated text.”
-”There’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate this form of therapy than typing.”
-”It’s possible that these findings may not hold up among people today, many of whom grew up with computers and are more accustomed to expressing themselves via typed text.”
-”Writing by hand may also improve a person’s memory for new information.”
-”The authors of that study say writing by hand may promote ‘deep encoding’ of new information in ways that keyboard writing does not.”
-”The fact that handwriting is a slower process than typing may be another perk”
-”Slowing down and writing by hand may come with other advantages.”
-”Writing longhand allows people more time to come up with the most appropriate word, which may facilitate better self-expression.”

Heid’s qualifications do damage his overall argument because he doesn’t sound certain about the facts he’s stating. He also overuses the word “may.”

3. I can easily distinguish between Heid's statements and the cited sources. He added hyperlinks and quotes some of his sources.

4. I usually take notes in class with pen and paper. I take notes on my class readings by writing on sticky notes and then sticking them into the book. I write down things for school, such as my homework and upcoming quizzes and tests.

Katie Fulmer

1) Markham Heid expounds upon multiple benefits that handwriting offers over typing. These include facilitating lower stress and depression symptoms while increasing immune function when doing emotion-focused writing, higher closure and therapeutic benefits when noting stressful life experiences, better memorizing information, more effectively expressing oneself, forming closer connections with others in dialogue, and more. I find the advantage of more effectively learning and remembering material most persuasive because I have personally experienced performing better on school assessments after writing notes longhand and doing poorly on tests after typing study material.
2) Heid softens his assertions with the word “may” or other forms suggesting possibility rather than certainty abundantly through out the article; he writes “that people may in some cases lose out when they abandon handwriting for keyboard-generated text”, “there’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate… therapy than typing”, that the benefits of longhand “may not hold up among people today,… whom grew up with computers”, “writing by hand may also improve a person’s memory”, “the fact that handwriting is a slower process than typing may be another perk”, penmanship “may facilitate better self-expression”, and “if words weren’t quite so easy to produce, it’s possible that people would treat them- and maybe each other- with a little more care”. His qualifications do not damage his overall argument because he is clarifying that not everything works equally as well as for others; for instance, many readers most likely agree with his statement of the benefits of handwriting over typing, but he is also open to the possibility that some of his audience may feel keyboarding is more beneficial for them.
3) It is not easy to distinguish between Heid’s own statements and the sources he cites. This is due to the fact that Heid barely mentions anything personal, and all of his arguments are from other sources (studies in the Journal of Traumatic Stress, Frontiers in Psychology, etc. and from Virginia Berninger at the University of Washington along with Daniel Oppenheimer from Carnegie Mellon University). Heid does not seem to follow the suggestions and techniques mentioned well because he does not state once his personal experience of the benefits of writing longhand rather than keyboarding(, which detracts from his argument as the audience is not able to read about the positives of the techniques he mentions).
4) I always take notes in class and on readings and complete personal writing (planning, journaling) with pen and paper. After two days of experimenting with doing all of my writings by typing on my computer, I observed many differences and can more greatly appreciate handwriting. For instance, when typing notes on my computer I was not as easily able to remember the information, when planning my days on Google Calendar I felt less organized than when writing in my normal agenda, and my eyes felt tired after staring at my screen for too long (which rarely happens when I am reading off of paper).

Alexis Nesbitt

1. In Heid's argument he states that some benefits of handwriting are that it helps people recognize their feelings and come to term with them. It also can lead to physical and mental health benefits by helping lower stress and depression symptoms. It exercises the brain making you use it more and helps with memory. Also in classroom settings handwriting can help the student take more effective notes by making that student actively listen to understand what the teacher is saying so they can summarize the lesson and turn it into something they understand. The advantage that is the most persuasive is the one about expressing your feelings because it's the most relate-able.
2. Heid softens his assertions with “may” or other forms suggesting possibility rather than certainty in the second, forth, fifth, and ninth paragraphs. His qualifications damage his overall argument because he's basing some of his points off of maybes and that makes his argument weaken because their not solid evidence.
3. It's hard to distinguish between Heid’s own statements and those of the sources he cites because he starts talking n his own words and then makes the evidence flow with his own so it's hard to tell whats the evidence and whats not whenever he does that.
4. I usually hand-write when taking notes in any class because to me it's easier and when I go back over them, I actually understand what I learned in the class. After doing the challenge and typing rather than hand-writing, I realized that it isn't as big as a help when I have to go back over and study what I wrote. Typing doesn't let me think about what I'm actually learning and it doesn't stick with me like writing it down does.

Makayla Stevens

1. In the article, “Bring back handwriting: it’s good for your brain”, Markham Heid argues that there are both physical and emotional advantages with handwriting. Writing helps many people recognize and understand their feelings which prevents depression and lowers stress. It also improves a person’s memory and self-expression. A problem for many young people is communication over text which is not a problem with a handwritten letter. These also create more appreciative feelings with someone. I find the advantage of improving my memory to be persuasive because I have personally gotten better grades on assignments in school based on handwriting my notes. Writing down notes is a way to study because it urges you to put notes in your own words and only write down the important information rather than typing it.

2. In paragraph three, Heid states “And there’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate this form of therapy than typing”, In paragraph six, “Writing by hand may also improve a person’s memory for new information” and “The authors of that study say writing by hand may promote “deep encoding” of new information in ways that keyboard writing does not”, in paragraph seven, “The fact that handwriting is a slower process than typing may be another perk, at least in some contexts”. These examples where Heid has inserted “may” to soften his assertions do not damage his argument because he is allowing readers to acknowledge that not everyone works the same and these suggestions/techniques may not work for you. It is producing a counterclaim and he understands that in some cases typing is a more efficient way like for instance he mentions time. Handwriting takes much more time than typing but he also includes that it helps with self-expression and the importance of handwriting rather than typing since it would only contain the most important things.

3. It is very difficult to determine Heid’s personal statements and those of sources because he rarely uses his own personal experiences. Most of his claim is supported through studies and psychology from others. Heid does not follow the suggestions provided because he believes a technique of handwriting is being personal but he does not mention personal examples in his writing.

4. On a normal school day I hand-write all of my notes and study material. I only use a keyboard to write emails and sometimes we are given the choice to type our papers. I am more successful when I write down information because I retain it more easily and put my notes in my own words to where I am able to understand exactly what we are learning. For me, typing will always take less time than handwriting but I will always benefit more from handwriting by memorizing the information.

Thomas Demetre

1. Markham Heid’s argument in his article “Bring Back Handwriting: It’s Good for Your Brain” regarding the benefits of handwriting is that handwriting offers deeper contact with one’s emotions, improvement of memory and learning, better self-expression, and kinder messages. Heid argues that handwriting helps emotions because it helps people come to terms with their feelings, which research shows led to “lower stress and fewer depression systems to improved immune function”. Heid provides evidence that handwriting provides a higher therapeutic benefit than that of typing. Heid also believes that handwriting improves cognitive skills and cites a 2017 study in the journal Frontiers of Psychology which proves that “brain regions associated with learning are more active when people completed a task by hand, as opposed to on a keyboard”. Heid also suggests that handwriting leads to better word choice, which leads to a better expression of thoughts. He then concludes that online writing is more harmful to offline writing, and stresses how handwriting is more unique and sincere. The most persuasive argument was the argument that handwriting improves memory and learning because it had the most recent studies to support it.
2. Heid softens his assertions in: “there’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate this form of therapy than typing” (paragraph 3), “It’s possible that these findings may not hold up among people today” (paragraph 4), “Writing by hand may also improve a person’s memory for new information” (paragraph 6). Heid’s softening of his claim and his qualifications do damage his overall argument. This is because of his uncertainty in the claims strengthens the fact that they are not sold, factual claims. Despite there being evidence to back the claim, the softening emphasizes the fact that handwriting does not affect everyone equally or in the same way and weakens Heid’s argument.
3. Heid’s own statements and those of the sources he cites are not easily distinguishable. He constantly reinforces what researchers and studies say instead of his own opinion. His reasoning is understandable because he wants to prove his point, but he fails to make the article his own and instead makes it more of a research paper.
4. I usually take notes on paper, unless the class asks for electronic notes. During a class reading, I always write on paper unless the assignment is online. When I do any other writing for myself, it is usually notes and reminders that can be on paper or my phone. I tend to understand information more when writing it or reading it from paper instead of online. I find writing it helps me slow my thoughts down while also keeping a steady stream of ideas.

Matthew Smith

1. Markham Heid expounds upon multiple benefits that handwriting offers over typing. These include facilitating lower stress and depression symptoms while increasing immune function when doing emotion-focused writing, higher closure and therapeutic benefits when noting stressful life experiences, better memorizing information, more effectively expressing oneself, forming closer connections with others in dialogue, and more. I find the advantage of more effectively learning and remembering material most persuasive because I have personally experienced performing better on school assessments after writing notes longhand and doing poorly on tests after typing study material.

2. Heid softens his assertions in: “there’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate this form of therapy than typing” (paragraph 3), “It’s possible that these findings may not hold up among people today” (paragraph 4), “Writing by hand may also improve a person’s memory for new information” (paragraph 6). Heid’s softening of his claim and his qualifications do damage his overall argument. This is because of his uncertainty in the claims strengthens the fact that they are not sold, factual claims. Despite there being evidence to back the claim, the softening emphasizes the fact that handwriting does not affect everyone equally or in the same way and weakens Heid’s argument.

3. It's hard to distinguish between Heid’s own statements and those of the sources he cites because he starts talking in his own words and then makes the evidence flow with his own so it's hard to tell whats the evidence and whats not whenever he does that.

4. I usually hand-write when taking notes in any class because to me it's easier and when I go back over them, I actually understand what I learned in the class. After doing the challenge and typing rather than hand-writing, I realized that it isn't as big as a help when I have to go back over and study what I wrote. Typing doesn't let me think about what I'm actually learning and it doesn't stick with me like writing it down does.

Kaitlyn Riley

1)In the article “Bring Back Handwriting: It’s Good For Your Brain” written by Markham Heid, the author argues the importance of handwritten text rather than typing on the computer. Heid discusses the numerous amounts of benefits that written text provides wich includes, a greater therapeutic value, improved memory, and is unique to the individual. When someone chooses to physically write with a pen in hand they use a different part of the brain rather than when typing. Through writing the individual is more involved and emotionally invested in their work, giving it a greater therapeutic value. Also physically writing information causes the writer to slow down, rather than on a computer one can quickly jot down information. When writing all the information, the writer has to slow down and understand the content which gives it a benefit of memory. Lastly writing is special and beneficial to an individual because how they chose to write and express their thoughts is unique to them and allows one to be way more creative than how they would type on a computer. There is a higher value to the time it takes to physically write out text that a computer does not compare to. I find the statement that writing with a pen has a more therapeutic value is Heid’s most persuasive argument. I agree that when one chooses to personally write out their thoughts and feelings it helps express their emotions better than typing them. By seeing the words on paper and how writing by hand works with the brain is a totally different experience than typing on a computer. Writing by hand takes more thought, time, energy and is overall more beneficial to an individual.
2) Throughout Heid’s argument, there are instances where he chooses to soften his assertions, causing a sense of uncertainty. For example, he states “...there’s evidence that people may in some cases lose out when they abandon handwriting for keyboard-generated text.”, “ And there’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate this form of therapy than typing.”, “It’s possible that these findings may not hold up among people today…”, “Writing by hand may also improve a person’s memory for new information.”, “The fact that handwriting is a slower process than typing may be another perk…”, and “Writing longhand allows people more time to come up with the most appropriate word, which may facilitate better self-expression.” The overuse of the word “may” and other tendencies to provide a sense of uncertainty does have the potential to weaken the argument, however, in this case, it does not have a negative effect. The reasoning for using “may” is because not everyone is the same and people’s brains work in different ways. What may benefit one’s well being may not work for another, and the reason for using may is because there might be some people who better from using a computer. Heid’s argument remains strong because he is able to recognize that not everyone is the same.
3) It is quite difficult to distinguish Heid’s own statements and those he collected from a source. This because Heid’s argument is heavily influenced by other sources and their ideas rather than his own. He lacks to provide any personal experiences or input and simply just provides evidence from other sources. Heid should have given more evidence from his own accounts rather than stating sources to create more credibility.
4) I personally write all of my notes from class on paper because I feel it allows me to have a more engaged and personal experience with the content I need to remember. On paper, I am able to write my notes in certain placements and orders that work best for me. I am not good at typing fast anyway so I find that typing in any form is difficult and I prefer to write. I do however use a computer and keyboard to text friends and write personal emails and messages because it is convenient in that sense. Overall I agree with Heid’s article and his argument of the importance of handwriting. The personalization and uniqueness of one’s handwritten thoughts do not compare to a computer.

Bryce Klein

In "Bring Back Handwriting: It's Good for Your Brain", Markham Heid describes the various reasons on why handwriting is mightier than keyboard typing. He does so by sorting a variety of sources to provide a basis for a claim. He includes many reasons, such as therapeutic advantages, memorization advantages, and the comparison of attitude when writing and typing. Heid believes these advantages put writing above typing. I agree with Heid's argument, and believe the slow paced nature of writing can do wonders compared to typing. However, I do not agree that it is ideal for memorization, as writing too slowly can make you miss out on important content.

1) Heid provides various advantages for writing over typing. He says it provides therapeutic, memorization, and attitude advantages. Slowly writing out ones thoughts allows the writer to process them more, which in turn allows an easier coping mechanism. The slow paced nature of writing forces people to rewrite words in their on phrasing, which forces them to think about the content. And for attitude, writing has shown to have far less toxicity than anonymous keyboard typing. I believe the therapeutic advantages are the most persuasive. Heid proclaims "“When we write a letter of the alphabet, we form it component stroke by component stroke, and that process of production involves pathways in the brain that go near or through parts that manage emotion,” says Virginia Berninger, a professor emerita of education at the University of Washington.", which provides a basis for why those advantages work. Not only that, it's from a reliable source, which adds more to the effect of this statement.

2) Heid consistently holds back on his assertions throughout the text. Some examples include "It’s possible that these findings may not hold up among people today...", "Writing by hand may also improve a person’s memory for new information.", and "The fact that handwriting is a slower process than typing may be another perk...". There are many other examples, but too many to fit. This continuous feature of his weakens his argument. His use of "may" shows that he is not certain regarding his statement. One could say that it is him avoiding bias, however, if he's making a statement tagged along a source, such as "Writing by hand may also improve a person’s memory for new information. A 2017 study in the journal Frontiers in Psychology...", then it shows that there is no bias. If the following source is full-proof, then he should have no doubt regarding his statement.

3) Heid's own statements and his sources are very easily distinguished between. Heid's own statements contain uncertain, with the use of "may", such as "Slowing down and writing by hand may come with other advantages.". The sources he sites have assertive statements regarding the evidence they found. (I don't have the textbook included in the question)

4) Whenever I take notes in class, I'm forced to use pen and paper. It's the same with class readings. Whenever I do writings by myself, I type. I would much prefer to type in class, as I see it as faster and more convenient. There are many differences between thought processes while typing and writing, and many memorization differences. Heid cites Oppenheimer with "“To do that, people had to think deeply about the material and actually understand the arguments. This helped them learn the material better.”" in reference to his previous statement saying that slowly writing helps memorization abilities. I disagree with this. I feel as if it can go both ways. While writing might be good in the moment, it may not be in the long run. One could have missed important information, due to them spending forever trying to reword what they're professor or teacher is saying. This would not be ideal for studying. However, when you type, you can type verbatim. While it may not be good for memorizing in the moment, it's faster, and is a good study material for after.

Abigail Oldfield

1. Heid says that people who write in longhand as opposed to typing do better on tests because they can't write note verbatim so they have to write them in their own words. He also says that people that write in longhand are healthier physically and mentally because the path that your brainwaves have to take so that you can create letters on a page, pass through the part of your brain that affects your emotions. In turn your are more connected to yourself emotionally and you become healthier. I believe that the argument about those that write instead of type are smarter because I have noticed the same thing when I am in class. When I write in longhand, I am forced to write slower so I have to put the idea in my own words. This makes me think more about what I am learning.

2.There are lots of places where Heid tries not to overstate his assertion. For example, "There are some cases where people may lose out when they abandon handwriting", "... can lead to measurable physical and mental health benefits", "It is possible that there is not the same connection to the emotional part of the brain", or "writing by hand my also improve a person's memory". These qualifications does slightly damage his argument because it seems as if he isn't fully confident in the information that he is trying to convey to readers. It makes it seem as if he is hesitant to make the argument, even though most of his claims are backed statistically.

3. It is very easy to distinguish between Heid's statements and those that he got from his sources. The statements made by the sources are assertive and there is no uncertainty to be found within them. Heid, on the other hand, is more unsure and you can see where his qualifications weaken the argument.

4. Whenever I am working on notes in class, I am always doing it with a pen and paper. When it comes to readings, I usually use a computer. I much prefer to use pen and paper because, just like Heid argued, I remember more of what I am taking notes on. I also have to think a bit more especially in some of my classes where my teacher lectures because I can't just write word for word. So I have to figure out how to write it in a more summarized way so that I don't forget all of the information. I also find my notes easier to study when they are on paper because I don't need to have a computer in front of me at all times to be able to review my work.

Rani Hameid

1. In Markham Heid’s essay, “Bring Back Handwriting: It’s Good for Your Brain,” Heid argues that writing by hand has mental health benefits, improves memory, and leads to better self-expression. Heid refers to “A commonly cited 1999 study in the Journal of Traumatic Stress” that found “that writing about a stressful life experience by hand, as opposed to typing about it, led to higher levels of self-disclosure and translated to greater therapeutic benefits.” He also cites “A 2017 study in the journal Frontiers in Psychology” which found that the regions of the brain associated with learning are more active when tasks are completed by hand rather than a keyboard. The advantage that I find most persuasive is the improved memory. Since I have to take plenty of notes in school, it is nice to know that writing it down will help me prepare for an upcoming test or quiz.

2. Heid softens his assertions often in this essay, some examples include, “there’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate this form of therapy than typing.” (paragraph 3), “It’s possible that these findings may not hold up among people today…” (paragraph 4), and “writing by hand may promote “deep encoding” of new information in ways that keyboard writing does not” (paragraph 6). His qualifications overall damage his argument. The word “may” suggests uncertainty, and despite using evidence to back it up, he damages his argument by sounding unsure.

3. It is difficult to distinguish Heid’s argument from the sources he cites. Instead of pushing his own opinion and argument, Heid constantly quotes studies and reinforces them rather than reinforcing his own argument. He is simply telling the reader about the studies and does not relate them to his main argument.

In class, I usually take notes with a pencil and paper. For class readings, I usually use sticky notes and take notes on them, unless it is an online reading, where I generally take notes on my computer. Any writings I do for myself I will most likely use paper, but if I am rushed I will use my laptop because it is faster. Overall, I prefer to write my notes with pencil and paper, I have observed that it helps me memorize notes and put thought into them.

Ellison

Heid says the advantages of handwriting are emotional, mental, and physical health. They also help cognitive abilities and memory. Writing things down can help reach different parts of your brain and can help you slow down making the information you may be writing easier to remember. I would say writing about your feelings is the most persuasive because it is very common to know someone that has or to have a diary where you write down memories that are known for helping a lot of people.


He softens his assertions in paragraph three “can lead”, paragraph four” say there’s reason to believe something”, paragraph six “may also”, and paragraph nine” which may facilitate”. This does damage his qualifications because of his overuse of the word “may” and that he doesn’t should sure of himself.

It is easy to distinguish Heidi Statements from his evidence because any evidence usually starts with a Psychologist or has some sort of research in it. He goes back and forward between evidence and his statements making it a little confusing.

I usually write down in most cases whether for school/personal reasons. I tried typing notes for a class and then remember then the following day and they were much harder to remember than usual when I write them down. When rewriting my notes down after I had to look back to my screen making I have to look at the words over and over helping me remember them without even realizing it. I do agree with Heid’s argument and feel like writing down things instead of typing is very beneficial. I think he uses good evidence to back up his argument.

Daminica Wells

In this article “Bring Back Handwriting: It’s Good For Your Brain” Markham Heid summarizes all the benefits you get from handwriting instead of typing. Heid describes the mental improvements it can bring from decreasing depression to improving comprehension. I personally agree with the argument that handwriting improves comprehension skills. As a person who takes notes with pen and paper I fond when it comes to answering a question I took notes on I remember how I wrote the subject down and what it says. I comprehend it better, but when I type I focus more on hitting the right keys because typing doesn’t come naturally to me.

1)Heid says that handwriting can improve a person's mental state. They can become more in touch with their emotions which can lead to a decrease in depression, improve the immune system, improve memory and comprehension skills. I think the most persuasive advantage is the improvement of comprehension. When I write down notes it helps me remember the content better because it becomes muscle memory in my mind.

2)He shows uncertainty in the following sentences “...there’s evidence that people may in some cases lose out when they abandon…”, “and there’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate…”, “It’s possible that maybe these findings may not hold up among people today…”,and “writing by hand may also improve…”, “...writing by hand may promote…”. His uncertainty doesn’t damage his argument. He still gets his point across but leaves room for the skeptics who don’t agree with him. He doesn’t force his argument into certainty, because many argue that handwriting is not a real science and instead is opinion based like astrology.

3)When addressing a claim made by his sources he gives the title and what kind of media the evidence is. This makes it easier to distinguish his claims from the claims of his evidence.

4)I preferably take all my notes with pen and paper unless if it is not convenient at the moment. When I do personal writing I don’t have paper and pens on me so I type them on phone as a convenience. The change from typing every essay I ever wrote to handwriting them was a big change. When handwriting I have to think more carefully because there are no spell checks, or quick fixes. If I make a mistake I have to fix it then or it could ruin the entire essay, but on a computer I can go back and edit my sentence structure without editing the whole essay.

Marie Truitt

In Markham Heid’s article, “Bring Back Handwriting: It’s Good for Your Brain”, Heid explains that people no longer opt to handwrite things. What used to be an everyday thing, is now a punishment by teachers and a tedious task for their students. Heid explains that it’s been understood by professionals that emotional, and personal writings keep people connected to themselves and can help them come to terms with certain hardships. It’s also been said that writing about personal feelings for 15 to 30 minutes a day has physical and mental health benefits. Writing also takes much longer to do than typing. Meaning, that by writing the information one is taking more time, and understanding what they are writing more thoroughly. Handwriting is important. Handwriting keeps people connected, and it is a very useful tool in learning.
Heid claims that handwriting offers the benefits of connection to oneself, and academic benefits. Professionals have acknowledged that writing one's feelings is a very good way to accept a hardship, to stay connected to one's self, or just keep a healthy mental state of mind. Academically, students who take handwritten notes tend to perform better than those who do not, as the students are absorbing the information in order to take the time to write it down. One’s mental health is very important, making that point a very persuasive one. Writing to maintain a healthy mind is a very real thing. One of the things that almost any professional will recommend is just taking a moment to put everything a person is feeling into words. This is where I stand, as my psychologist recommended it to me, and I know it works. I know it works for me, and the fact that she recommended it meant it must have worked for other people as well.
Heid softens his argument with words like “may” or forms of suggestion instead of assertion when he states, “It’s possible that these findings may not hold up among people today”, “...there’s evidence that people may in some cases lose out when they abandon handwriting”, “..there’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate this form of therapy”, “The fact that handwriting is a slower process than typing may be another perk, at least in some contexts.” In the last instance, not only does Heid soften the statement by saying may, he also clarifies that it may vary on the circumstances. Softening sentences sometimes is a good thing, if something is stated as absolute fact and then disproven, it’s much more damaging to the credibility of the piece. However, the fact that Heid does it so often damages his argument. Almost all of his evidence is presented, and then given a bit of slack. As in, he presents his argument and then proposes the idea that he may not be right. A confident speaker can sell anything, Heid just does not use his words to convey a confident tone.
Heid relies very much on the sources he uses. He uses a lot of sources, and uses mostly the sources ideas rather than presenting his own. However, Heid sometimes builds off of these arguments, other times he does not. It makes it a bit difficult to distinguish, as Heid uses other people's ideas in the text much more than his own, though he does clearly cite his sources.
I prefer to take notes by hand. They look neater, and they force the information better into my brain. The fact that handwritten notes are neater make them more easy to go back and study. Studying from a computer screen is bright, and distracting. The other writing I do for myself is emotional writing. I write the things that happen to me, and how they make me feel. For these things, I use paper. I carry a small notebook with me wherever I go.

Taylor Mills

1. In the article, “Bring back handwriting: it’s good for your brain”, Markham Heid tells us that there are many advantages of handwriting rather than typing as it is both physical and emotional, to creates stronger pathways in the emotional part of our thought process, giving us more of a connection to what we are writing and how it affects us, while we have so slow at typing that we have to think about what we are to write and often rephrase it to shorten what we have to write in order to keep up.

2. It is heavily suggested in the article that the results of handwriting versus typing are very subjective as, are you even reading this because god I hope not, many people have very different methods of learning and can understand things in very different ways allowing for a large marginal error as we as human are not alike in every way vary in personal preference. I have no clue what I am writing. So it makes it easy to establish what is evident as he presents it as a psychological study rather than more of a speculation.

3. Heid uses very few of his own personal statements allowing us to assume that most of his evidence is outside information and is cited from psychological studies. The article is well written because of the amount of outside information but lacks the depth that could be created if the author were to use his own experiences, that would be reliable as his a person living in modern-day, making him almost an expert on the difference between typing and handwriting.

4. Day to day I personally take notes by hand as it allows me to put the information in terms I know I can understand and allows me to study and review. I raise my retention rate and it allows me to look back on how I felt about the topic as I could tell from my handwritten how much effort I put into it at the time and I could better study knowing what type of situation I was in. I've found that when I type thing I manage to forget what I was even typing.

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