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07/19/2021

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Ardel Jones

I agree that journalists and the news media choose to highlight “spectacle, conflict, disruption” over stories that cover “the substance of movements because I lived it doing the summer of 2020 and many other times after. I’ve always wondered what did the pass actions of someone have to do with the killing of them by police today. It’s like a parent punishing a child who is know 18 for something they did while they were 10, its just not right. And this idea of protest paradigm does the very same thing, it in the words of Danielle Kilgo it undermines the victimhood of the actual victims. Before we hear anything about what occurred, we hear from police that “they were a bad person” because they had a record, which in most cases time was already served time for. So, when protest start over the unjustified taking of a black life, because the media has already pushed the idea that the victim was some type of thug, the protest are delegitimized before they even start. This action is pushed further doing the protest when the actions of 1% of protesters are conveyed to the world as the actions of all protects. One person throws a bottle and you hear the classic saying “the once peaceful protest, has now turned violent.” I started by saying I agreed with Kilgo because I lived it doing the summer of 2020. After the senseless murder of George Floyd, I took to the streets of Jacksonville and marched for weeks with other pastors across the city. One particular day we were protesting in front of the court house peacefully for hours and even had a rally. For hours Black Lives Matter advocates and others showed no violence nor the threat of violence. Then comes a call from my wife “baby are you ok and safe?” My reply was “yes, I’m fine, why do you ask?” Her response to me changed the complete narrative of the day, “the news is showing people fighting, and are saying you all are violent.” I was there it wasn’t any violence, then later that day I found out the violence happened more than ten blocks from the protest and had nothing to do with us, but the media included us in the story anyway. What media chooses to run, shapes how must people see things, which in of it self is a horrible combination.

Jimmy Jordon


word or narrative. There is power in the media, and our founding father knew
it, along with the media itself. The sad thing is the media is using the power
they have for person gain instead of what it is meant for. Danielle Kilgo did a
very good job at how she presented her facts and I agree with them.

Jimmy Jordon

revised: I agree that media does exaggerate or underexaggerate, thus changing the
story on protests and many other things. Media today changes so much no
matter what side you are on, to the media it’s all about making money. The
article specifically talks about protests and how protests can have the
narrative changed on them. I think many times protests that are violent may
be changed to look peaceful and for protest that are peaceful can be
changed to look violent. Its all about perspective and the media knows it.
The media can cause panic, happiness, and much more with the change of a
word or narrative. There is power in the media, and our founding father knew
it, along with the media itself. The sad thing is the media is using the power
they have for person gain instead of what it is meant for. Danielle Kilgo did a
very good job at how she presented her facts and I agree with them.

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