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10/01/2019

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Lauren Salazer

The author, Robert Britt, argues that time can make one happier than money. Britt states that people who value time over money tend to do things because they want to, not because they have to. His purpose for this article is to show how time is truly so much more important to so many people. He does argue that money can buy some happiness of course, however, most people are happier spending money by buying more time. For example, to pay for a babysitter or for someone to clean the house, in order to get other things done. Britt also mentions a survey where people were asked to rank various activities. The conclusion was that many people ranked family, friends and the outdoors much higher than a job or career choice. Britt concludes by portraying how important time is by indicating how many people fear they do not have enough time, causing unhappiness and raising levels of anxiety, depression, and stress. Time is a valuable component to many people, so we must not take it for granted.
I agree with Britt’s view that time can make you happier than money. Although I do agree money can buy happiness, time spent with family and friends is for sure more valuable. Owning luxurious items can be exciting and fun, but at the end of the day, memories are valued more than objects. Decisions made by people based on time versus money tend to be more meaningful because it is what they want to do. Choosing time makes people happier with life rather than those who choose money because money cannot buy family, friends, or activities spent with these people. Though some may still argue society implies a necessity for making a beneficial salary, thus making money more valuable, time is of the essence and takes the lead in being valued more.

Ricky Luu

In the article “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money,” the author Robert Roy Britt is arguing that through all the ages and stages, having more time to think outside making more money is happier than only living a life that is defined by making more money. His purpose in writing this article is to inform people that having money does not necessarily mean that a person is happy. He uses different parameters of life like age and the stages in life, like when one is in college and when people are old. He argues that people who have average annual earnings and who have a lot of time to take part in leisure activities and helping others are happier than people who earn loads of money. Through the use of many supporting researchers, he drives the point that people find more happiness out of creating more time or even paying for time rather than working at all times like it is in the current social setting. People who create more time to hang out with friends and family, explore their life adventures, are happier than the people who work on a daily basis and make more money.
I agree with Robert’s view relating happiness with both time and money factor. Although money can buy happiness to some extent due to the ability to afford some basic needs and luxury, the time factor brings a sense of more happiness because it lets one live outside the daily requirement. Most people work daily and extra hours because they have to. It is not out of their will. If all people had a chance of affording material possession, nobody would choose to work rather than having fun with family, exploring the world and helping other people and society in general.

Aislinn Haselden

The author, Robert Roy Britt, suggests that, in the long-term, people who value time over money are happier. Many people assume that material possessions outweigh experiences in terms of happiness. Birthdays and Christmases are joyful celebrations most notably marked by their exchange of gifts which could easily be replaced by dollar signs. The belief that money - represented by physical objects - can make a person happier than a fun experience - such as a game of paintball, or skydiving - can leave many people favoring the material over the experience. However, after looking into multiple studies investigating this phenomenon, Britt explains that people whose decisions are influenced based on the meaning of an experience rather than money are more likely to pursue things they enjoy which leads them to building a happier existence.
I agree with Britt’s statements that investing in experiences rather than the material can lead to a happier existence for an individual. The act of acquiring a long-held desire through purchase can fill us like a sparkling cider and leave us feeling giddy and satisfied. However, that initial feeling of infatuation will always wear off, and the new possession - whether that be an expensive necklace, specially-made jacket, or the newest gaming system - will fade in our eyes until it’s simply just another background item. The exact opposite is true of an experience. An experience is something that cannot be sold or given away. An experience is something that you look back on fondly, shared with loved ones and cherished as long as your memory holds out. Compare that with a material object, which will most likely be largely forgotten over the span of a week or two.

Quinten Warren

In the Article “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money” the author Rober Britt argues that people who value their time over money are happier because of how they live out their life. Britt uses multiple studies to back his claims starting off with a study of recent graduates of the University of British Columbia. He uses the Study’s findings to reinforce his notation that by focusing on time, people then make their lifestyle-based decisions on meaning, rather than what pays the bills. Britt does admit that how much debt a student graduates with influences what they value coming out of college, but that people who value time are still “choosing to do things because they want to, not because they have to”. Britt also discusses how people are happier when they make timesaving purchases, but studies show that when faced with decision to buy things rather than spend money to save time, they overwhelmingly choose to buy things. Bill relates this to an existing problem among American people in which they feel as though they never have enough time in their day. He explains that this is the cause for a large amount of stress and anxiety people struggle with and in order to fix the problem, one’s internal mindset has to switch from a money-orientated state to a time sensitive one. Britt finishes off by offering many simple ways to live a time orientated life that are generally overlooked within society like getting active more, spending time with friends and family, and volunteering.

I agree with Britt’s notion that an emphasis on time in a person’s mindset can bring them newfound joy and happiness that they did not have before. While I do believe that a focus on time brings joy and leads to a healthy life, I think that most people would choose to focus on time if given the opportunity. The American society values the “get rich quick” lifestyle too greatly and the cooperate driven world we live in doesn’t give much room for college graduates to spend their time on much else than money. I believe the mindset of a society would need to change just as much as the individual in order for any significant impact to occur amongst the masses anywhere on the world today. Once achieved however, I believe the pursuit of happiness rather than the pursuit of cash would have immensely positive effects on the mass majority of people and would curve many of the mental health problems people all over the world are experiencing today.

Carli Vaughan

In the article, “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money,” Robert Roy Britt argues that people who value time over money are generally happier in life. He supports his argument by first using a study that concluded 62% out of 1,000 students said they chose time over money and were happier. Britt strengthens his viewpoint by moving onto research of adults, talking about a 2016 study that proved people who valued more money were “happier and more satisfied with life than people who chose money.” The author acknowledges that money has shown to buy happiness, but only up to a certain point. On the other hand, studies have shown that using money to “buy time,” such as cleaning services, brings more satisfaction that buying material things.

I agree that people who value time over money are happier in life because they are not constantly focused on a number and they are focused on what they want in life. I think it is draining to constantly worry about how much money one’s making or how many luxurious things one can own when you can enjoy your time doing things you find meaning in. Our whole lives are made up of time, we should value the time we have to fill our lives with memories and adventure rather than thoughts of greed. I also agree with Britt that people enjoy using money to “buy time” because I have experienced it first-hand through times such as cleaning ladies coming to my house and buying vacation “time.” Time is fleeding so we may as well use as much of it as we can for experience.

Abby Galunas

In the article “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money,” the author, Robert Roy Britt, argues that time is more valuable than money. Britt suggests that people who value time over money tend to be happier, pursue things they enjoy, and make decisions based on meaning, rather than impulse. To support his argument, Britt comments on research done by different people. He used a Pew Research Center survey as an example, claiming that when people were “asked to rank various activities based on meaningfulness, people chose spending time with family, outdoors, and with friends as the top three, followed by spending time with pets, listening to music, reading, and religion.” They found that “eighth place” was held by job and career. However, Britt states that “money can buy some happiness,” but he concludes that it can “only up to a point.” Britt uses volunteering as an example of a valuable use of time. To further support his claim, Britt also suggests that people who volunteer their time are “happier, healthier, and live longer.”

I agree with Britt’s argument that time is more valuable than money, and that it can make you happier. Although I understand how having money could make someone happy in the moment, money is something that may not always bring constant happiness. In other words, money is a materialistic thing, and it’s something that may not always be around to bring someone happiness. In our society, people tend to value money because it’s something they can use when they want and however they want to make themselves happy. It’s a very “in the moment” and impulsive form of a supposed “happiness”. I think the biggest takeaway from the article is that we should spend time wisely, and find things that we can actively participate in and enjoy, rather than material things.

Brycen Hyde

In the article “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money,” Robert Roy Britt argues that people that whom focus solely on having money, are drastically more unhappy than those who focus on their time. His purpose and central point are to argue one of the most constant arguments in all walks of life; money alone cannot give you happiness. Britt puts forth multiple statistics that show the reader that the higher percentage of people believe that time is much more valuable than money. The central argument is that making decisions focused on time and meaning, will make your life much more impactful and happier than if you were to make decisions on what will make you money. Britt admits that money does in fact make things easier in life, but he stresses that having meaningful, well valued time, is so much more crucial than making money. The second central point to Britt’s argument is having a good system of controlling your time so you don’t become “time-stressed.” Britt’s main idea is that it is of the utmost importance to have a good system of spending your time to truly pursue happiness. Pursuing a sense of personal accomplishment, competence, and efficiency is important to truly feel happy. Britt stresses getting outside, hanging out with friends, exercising, taking vacations, and being all around active is absolutely central to being happy.

I undoubtably agree with everything Britt is arguing, I believe that time is incredibly more important than having money. I can see the opposite argument and I do agree that having a large amount of money can make you very happy but having valuable experiences in your life is simply much more important. Britt’s argument that being active, getting outside, spending time with friends, and especially taking vacations is crucial to pursuing happiness. I do understand that being able to travel does ironically require money, but there are so many things a person can do to make their time more valuable. Simply spending quality time with friends or people and being outside is one of the most valuable things a person can do. I believe money cannot buy happiness and the true way to happiness is to value your life, and to make the most out of the things you are able to do. Time is much more valuable than money; family, friends, and personal competence are crucial to having a meaningful, and valuable life. This is Britt’s central argument and I wholeheartedly agree with everything he has said, meaningful time will undoubtably make you much happier than money.

Brycen Hyde

In the article “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money,” Robert Roy Britt argues that
people whom focus solely on having money, are drastically more unhappy than those who focus
on their time. His purpose and central point are to argue one of the most constant arguments in
all walks of life; money alone cannot bring you happiness. Britt puts forth multiple statistics that
show the reader that a much higher percentage of people believe that time is much more valuable
than money. The central argument in Britt’s article is that making decisions focused on time and
meaning, will make your life much more impactful and happier than if you were to make
decisions on what will make you money. Britt admits that money does in fact make things easier
in life, but he stresses that having meaningful, well valued time, is so much more crucial than
making money. The second central point to Britt’s argument is having a good system of
controlling your time so you don’t become “time-stressed.” Britt’s main idea is that it is of the
utmost importance to have a good system of spending your time to truly pursue happiness.
Pursuing a sense of personal accomplishment, competence, and efficiency is important to truly
feel happy. Britt stresses that getting outside, hanging out with friends, exercising, taking
vacations, and being all around active is absolutely central to being happy.
I undoubtably agree with everything Britt is arguing, I believe that time is incredibly
more important than having money. I can see the opposite argument and I do agree that having a
large amount of money can make you very happy for a time but having valuable experiences in
your life is simply much more important. Britt’s argument that being active, getting outside,
spending time with friends, and especially taking vacations is crucial to pursuing happiness is
entirely true. I do understand that being able to travel does ironically require money, but there are
so many things a person can do to make their time more valuable. Simply spending quality time
with friends or people and being outside is one of the most valuable things a person can do to
experience some of the great things life has to offer. I believe money cannot buy happiness and
the true way to happiness is to value your life, and to make the most out of the things you are
able to do, not to worry about making enough money to do the things you cannot do. Time is
much more valuable than money; family, friends, and personal competence are crucial to having
a meaningful, and valuable life. I wholeheartedly agree with everything Britt has said,
meaningful time will undoubtably make you much happier than money.

Brooke DeGrande

In his article, Robert Roy Britt argues that individuals who live their lives valuing time over money are typically happier people. His purpose in writing this article is to try and persuade his readers to think about their values more in depth, challenging them to look specifically at their attitudes regarding time and money. That being said, Britt argues that people who choose to value their time over money tend to do things because they want to, not because they must. Britt later presents his audience with the common misconception that those who focus on materialistic success are found to be happier than people who sacrifice money for leisure time. He does admit that yes, money can buy “some happiness,” but this happiness only goes so far. Britt supports this notion as he presents statistics proving that United States citizens who make an annual ninety-five-thousand-dollar income are generally happier than those whose surpass that threshold. It has been argued that once that level of income is reached, any increase commonly results in “reduced life satisfaction” and a focus shift from time to money. Throughout the article, Britt listed several other case studies that supported his claim using different age groups coming from backgrounds, unanimously proving that for everyone happiness comes more from their use of time than money. Using these statistics, Britt was able to drive home his point that people find more happiness through valuing their time to gain experiences rather than materialistic possessions. Closing his article, Britt presents his readers with ways to value their time in return for happiness. By simply spending more time with family and friends or outdoors exercising Britt argues it is likely one will live a happier, more advantageous lifestyle.
I agree with Britt’s belief that individuals who value the experiences time gives you over the materialistic possessions’ money can buy you live a happier lifestyle. Although I do agree that money can buy some happiness, I think it is due to the lasting impact an experience has on someone that raises the value of time over money. In other words, the objects money can buy you are typically temporary possessions, but time spent with friends and family are irreplaceable and remembered forever. Moreover, the happiness that money can provide you with is also mostly temporary and will fade away while the memories and adventures you undergo in time will last a lifetime. It is not that money never coincides with happiness, because it does, everyone has things that money can buy which will make them happier, but what should be focused on is in the long run. The lasting memories you gain by spending your time doing things you love with the people closest to you outweigh anything that money could buy you. A price value can not be placed on time. The experiences time gives a person is something that should not be overlooked but cherished for a long period of time.

Grady Meeks

"Time Can Make You Happier Than Money" by Robert Britt, argues that choosing time over money will bring you more long term happiness in life, along with spending your time on thing that make you happy, rather than things to make you money. I agree with Britt's argument and think time is more important than money. The two assertions are compatible because they both compare money and it's importance and time and it's importance. Money doesn't contribute to meaningfulness because the author assumes that the audience is using money in a meaningful way, like for college tuition, as mentioned in the article. Britt argues that time is more meaningful to your well-being than meaning. I agree with the article on this based on my own experiences. I don't think Britt should have put his purpose earlier. By leaving it until the third paragraph, it builds up his credibility by providing the audience with many facts to give the audience a reason to trust him. Britt's framing is good because it provides a good amount of information for the audience to find the research creditable. If he provided more it might have included too much information that could be not useful. "A 2016 study of 4,000 U.S. adults found that people who valued time more than money were 'happier and more satisfied with life than the people who chose money,' even after the researchers accounted for differences in age, income, and the amount of time people spent at work or at leisure..." This line shows that Britt provides enough information to give the reader a good summary of the research and be able to find it creditable, because it includes facts about the research. I value time more than money. However I still value money because things in this world cost money and sometimes it cost money to spend your time on things. Enough for me would probably be around $65,000 a year; enough to supply me for things I would need, like housing and food, and also allow me to have fun experiences, like vacation.

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