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10/01/2019

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Lauren Salazer

The author, Robert Britt, argues that time can make one happier than money. Britt states that people who value time over money tend to do things because they want to, not because they have to. His purpose for this article is to show how time is truly so much more important to so many people. He does argue that money can buy some happiness of course, however, most people are happier spending money by buying more time. For example, to pay for a babysitter or for someone to clean the house, in order to get other things done. Britt also mentions a survey where people were asked to rank various activities. The conclusion was that many people ranked family, friends and the outdoors much higher than a job or career choice. Britt concludes by portraying how important time is by indicating how many people fear they do not have enough time, causing unhappiness and raising levels of anxiety, depression, and stress. Time is a valuable component to many people, so we must not take it for granted.
I agree with Britt’s view that time can make you happier than money. Although I do agree money can buy happiness, time spent with family and friends is for sure more valuable. Owning luxurious items can be exciting and fun, but at the end of the day, memories are valued more than objects. Decisions made by people based on time versus money tend to be more meaningful because it is what they want to do. Choosing time makes people happier with life rather than those who choose money because money cannot buy family, friends, or activities spent with these people. Though some may still argue society implies a necessity for making a beneficial salary, thus making money more valuable, time is of the essence and takes the lead in being valued more.

Ricky Luu

In the article “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money,” the author Robert Roy Britt is arguing that through all the ages and stages, having more time to think outside making more money is happier than only living a life that is defined by making more money. His purpose in writing this article is to inform people that having money does not necessarily mean that a person is happy. He uses different parameters of life like age and the stages in life, like when one is in college and when people are old. He argues that people who have average annual earnings and who have a lot of time to take part in leisure activities and helping others are happier than people who earn loads of money. Through the use of many supporting researchers, he drives the point that people find more happiness out of creating more time or even paying for time rather than working at all times like it is in the current social setting. People who create more time to hang out with friends and family, explore their life adventures, are happier than the people who work on a daily basis and make more money.
I agree with Robert’s view relating happiness with both time and money factor. Although money can buy happiness to some extent due to the ability to afford some basic needs and luxury, the time factor brings a sense of more happiness because it lets one live outside the daily requirement. Most people work daily and extra hours because they have to. It is not out of their will. If all people had a chance of affording material possession, nobody would choose to work rather than having fun with family, exploring the world and helping other people and society in general.

Aislinn Haselden

The author, Robert Roy Britt, suggests that, in the long-term, people who value time over money are happier. Many people assume that material possessions outweigh experiences in terms of happiness. Birthdays and Christmases are joyful celebrations most notably marked by their exchange of gifts which could easily be replaced by dollar signs. The belief that money - represented by physical objects - can make a person happier than a fun experience - such as a game of paintball, or skydiving - can leave many people favoring the material over the experience. However, after looking into multiple studies investigating this phenomenon, Britt explains that people whose decisions are influenced based on the meaning of an experience rather than money are more likely to pursue things they enjoy which leads them to building a happier existence.
I agree with Britt’s statements that investing in experiences rather than the material can lead to a happier existence for an individual. The act of acquiring a long-held desire through purchase can fill us like a sparkling cider and leave us feeling giddy and satisfied. However, that initial feeling of infatuation will always wear off, and the new possession - whether that be an expensive necklace, specially-made jacket, or the newest gaming system - will fade in our eyes until it’s simply just another background item. The exact opposite is true of an experience. An experience is something that cannot be sold or given away. An experience is something that you look back on fondly, shared with loved ones and cherished as long as your memory holds out. Compare that with a material object, which will most likely be largely forgotten over the span of a week or two.

Quinten Warren

In the Article “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money” the author Rober Britt argues that people who value their time over money are happier because of how they live out their life. Britt uses multiple studies to back his claims starting off with a study of recent graduates of the University of British Columbia. He uses the Study’s findings to reinforce his notation that by focusing on time, people then make their lifestyle-based decisions on meaning, rather than what pays the bills. Britt does admit that how much debt a student graduates with influences what they value coming out of college, but that people who value time are still “choosing to do things because they want to, not because they have to”. Britt also discusses how people are happier when they make timesaving purchases, but studies show that when faced with decision to buy things rather than spend money to save time, they overwhelmingly choose to buy things. Bill relates this to an existing problem among American people in which they feel as though they never have enough time in their day. He explains that this is the cause for a large amount of stress and anxiety people struggle with and in order to fix the problem, one’s internal mindset has to switch from a money-orientated state to a time sensitive one. Britt finishes off by offering many simple ways to live a time orientated life that are generally overlooked within society like getting active more, spending time with friends and family, and volunteering.

I agree with Britt’s notion that an emphasis on time in a person’s mindset can bring them newfound joy and happiness that they did not have before. While I do believe that a focus on time brings joy and leads to a healthy life, I think that most people would choose to focus on time if given the opportunity. The American society values the “get rich quick” lifestyle too greatly and the cooperate driven world we live in doesn’t give much room for college graduates to spend their time on much else than money. I believe the mindset of a society would need to change just as much as the individual in order for any significant impact to occur amongst the masses anywhere on the world today. Once achieved however, I believe the pursuit of happiness rather than the pursuit of cash would have immensely positive effects on the mass majority of people and would curve many of the mental health problems people all over the world are experiencing today.

Carli Vaughan

In the article, “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money,” Robert Roy Britt argues that people who value time over money are generally happier in life. He supports his argument by first using a study that concluded 62% out of 1,000 students said they chose time over money and were happier. Britt strengthens his viewpoint by moving onto research of adults, talking about a 2016 study that proved people who valued more money were “happier and more satisfied with life than people who chose money.” The author acknowledges that money has shown to buy happiness, but only up to a certain point. On the other hand, studies have shown that using money to “buy time,” such as cleaning services, brings more satisfaction that buying material things.

I agree that people who value time over money are happier in life because they are not constantly focused on a number and they are focused on what they want in life. I think it is draining to constantly worry about how much money one’s making or how many luxurious things one can own when you can enjoy your time doing things you find meaning in. Our whole lives are made up of time, we should value the time we have to fill our lives with memories and adventure rather than thoughts of greed. I also agree with Britt that people enjoy using money to “buy time” because I have experienced it first-hand through times such as cleaning ladies coming to my house and buying vacation “time.” Time is fleeding so we may as well use as much of it as we can for experience.

Abby Galunas

In the article “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money,” the author, Robert Roy Britt, argues that time is more valuable than money. Britt suggests that people who value time over money tend to be happier, pursue things they enjoy, and make decisions based on meaning, rather than impulse. To support his argument, Britt comments on research done by different people. He used a Pew Research Center survey as an example, claiming that when people were “asked to rank various activities based on meaningfulness, people chose spending time with family, outdoors, and with friends as the top three, followed by spending time with pets, listening to music, reading, and religion.” They found that “eighth place” was held by job and career. However, Britt states that “money can buy some happiness,” but he concludes that it can “only up to a point.” Britt uses volunteering as an example of a valuable use of time. To further support his claim, Britt also suggests that people who volunteer their time are “happier, healthier, and live longer.”

I agree with Britt’s argument that time is more valuable than money, and that it can make you happier. Although I understand how having money could make someone happy in the moment, money is something that may not always bring constant happiness. In other words, money is a materialistic thing, and it’s something that may not always be around to bring someone happiness. In our society, people tend to value money because it’s something they can use when they want and however they want to make themselves happy. It’s a very “in the moment” and impulsive form of a supposed “happiness”. I think the biggest takeaway from the article is that we should spend time wisely, and find things that we can actively participate in and enjoy, rather than material things.

Brycen Hyde

In the article “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money,” Robert Roy Britt argues that people that whom focus solely on having money, are drastically more unhappy than those who focus on their time. His purpose and central point are to argue one of the most constant arguments in all walks of life; money alone cannot give you happiness. Britt puts forth multiple statistics that show the reader that the higher percentage of people believe that time is much more valuable than money. The central argument is that making decisions focused on time and meaning, will make your life much more impactful and happier than if you were to make decisions on what will make you money. Britt admits that money does in fact make things easier in life, but he stresses that having meaningful, well valued time, is so much more crucial than making money. The second central point to Britt’s argument is having a good system of controlling your time so you don’t become “time-stressed.” Britt’s main idea is that it is of the utmost importance to have a good system of spending your time to truly pursue happiness. Pursuing a sense of personal accomplishment, competence, and efficiency is important to truly feel happy. Britt stresses getting outside, hanging out with friends, exercising, taking vacations, and being all around active is absolutely central to being happy.

I undoubtably agree with everything Britt is arguing, I believe that time is incredibly more important than having money. I can see the opposite argument and I do agree that having a large amount of money can make you very happy but having valuable experiences in your life is simply much more important. Britt’s argument that being active, getting outside, spending time with friends, and especially taking vacations is crucial to pursuing happiness. I do understand that being able to travel does ironically require money, but there are so many things a person can do to make their time more valuable. Simply spending quality time with friends or people and being outside is one of the most valuable things a person can do. I believe money cannot buy happiness and the true way to happiness is to value your life, and to make the most out of the things you are able to do. Time is much more valuable than money; family, friends, and personal competence are crucial to having a meaningful, and valuable life. This is Britt’s central argument and I wholeheartedly agree with everything he has said, meaningful time will undoubtably make you much happier than money.

Brycen Hyde

In the article “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money,” Robert Roy Britt argues that
people whom focus solely on having money, are drastically more unhappy than those who focus
on their time. His purpose and central point are to argue one of the most constant arguments in
all walks of life; money alone cannot bring you happiness. Britt puts forth multiple statistics that
show the reader that a much higher percentage of people believe that time is much more valuable
than money. The central argument in Britt’s article is that making decisions focused on time and
meaning, will make your life much more impactful and happier than if you were to make
decisions on what will make you money. Britt admits that money does in fact make things easier
in life, but he stresses that having meaningful, well valued time, is so much more crucial than
making money. The second central point to Britt’s argument is having a good system of
controlling your time so you don’t become “time-stressed.” Britt’s main idea is that it is of the
utmost importance to have a good system of spending your time to truly pursue happiness.
Pursuing a sense of personal accomplishment, competence, and efficiency is important to truly
feel happy. Britt stresses that getting outside, hanging out with friends, exercising, taking
vacations, and being all around active is absolutely central to being happy.
I undoubtably agree with everything Britt is arguing, I believe that time is incredibly
more important than having money. I can see the opposite argument and I do agree that having a
large amount of money can make you very happy for a time but having valuable experiences in
your life is simply much more important. Britt’s argument that being active, getting outside,
spending time with friends, and especially taking vacations is crucial to pursuing happiness is
entirely true. I do understand that being able to travel does ironically require money, but there are
so many things a person can do to make their time more valuable. Simply spending quality time
with friends or people and being outside is one of the most valuable things a person can do to
experience some of the great things life has to offer. I believe money cannot buy happiness and
the true way to happiness is to value your life, and to make the most out of the things you are
able to do, not to worry about making enough money to do the things you cannot do. Time is
much more valuable than money; family, friends, and personal competence are crucial to having
a meaningful, and valuable life. I wholeheartedly agree with everything Britt has said,
meaningful time will undoubtably make you much happier than money.

Brooke DeGrande

In his article, Robert Roy Britt argues that individuals who live their lives valuing time over money are typically happier people. His purpose in writing this article is to try and persuade his readers to think about their values more in depth, challenging them to look specifically at their attitudes regarding time and money. That being said, Britt argues that people who choose to value their time over money tend to do things because they want to, not because they must. Britt later presents his audience with the common misconception that those who focus on materialistic success are found to be happier than people who sacrifice money for leisure time. He does admit that yes, money can buy “some happiness,” but this happiness only goes so far. Britt supports this notion as he presents statistics proving that United States citizens who make an annual ninety-five-thousand-dollar income are generally happier than those whose surpass that threshold. It has been argued that once that level of income is reached, any increase commonly results in “reduced life satisfaction” and a focus shift from time to money. Throughout the article, Britt listed several other case studies that supported his claim using different age groups coming from backgrounds, unanimously proving that for everyone happiness comes more from their use of time than money. Using these statistics, Britt was able to drive home his point that people find more happiness through valuing their time to gain experiences rather than materialistic possessions. Closing his article, Britt presents his readers with ways to value their time in return for happiness. By simply spending more time with family and friends or outdoors exercising Britt argues it is likely one will live a happier, more advantageous lifestyle.
I agree with Britt’s belief that individuals who value the experiences time gives you over the materialistic possessions’ money can buy you live a happier lifestyle. Although I do agree that money can buy some happiness, I think it is due to the lasting impact an experience has on someone that raises the value of time over money. In other words, the objects money can buy you are typically temporary possessions, but time spent with friends and family are irreplaceable and remembered forever. Moreover, the happiness that money can provide you with is also mostly temporary and will fade away while the memories and adventures you undergo in time will last a lifetime. It is not that money never coincides with happiness, because it does, everyone has things that money can buy which will make them happier, but what should be focused on is in the long run. The lasting memories you gain by spending your time doing things you love with the people closest to you outweigh anything that money could buy you. A price value can not be placed on time. The experiences time gives a person is something that should not be overlooked but cherished for a long period of time.

Grady Meeks

"Time Can Make You Happier Than Money" by Robert Britt, argues that choosing time over money will bring you more long term happiness in life, along with spending your time on thing that make you happy, rather than things to make you money. I agree with Britt's argument and think time is more important than money. The two assertions are compatible because they both compare money and it's importance and time and it's importance. Money doesn't contribute to meaningfulness because the author assumes that the audience is using money in a meaningful way, like for college tuition, as mentioned in the article. Britt argues that time is more meaningful to your well-being than meaning. I agree with the article on this based on my own experiences. I don't think Britt should have put his purpose earlier. By leaving it until the third paragraph, it builds up his credibility by providing the audience with many facts to give the audience a reason to trust him. Britt's framing is good because it provides a good amount of information for the audience to find the research creditable. If he provided more it might have included too much information that could be not useful. "A 2016 study of 4,000 U.S. adults found that people who valued time more than money were 'happier and more satisfied with life than the people who chose money,' even after the researchers accounted for differences in age, income, and the amount of time people spent at work or at leisure..." This line shows that Britt provides enough information to give the reader a good summary of the research and be able to find it creditable, because it includes facts about the research. I value time more than money. However I still value money because things in this world cost money and sometimes it cost money to spend your time on things. Enough for me would probably be around $65,000 a year; enough to supply me for things I would need, like housing and food, and also allow me to have fun experiences, like vacation.

John Singletary

"Time Can Make You Happier Than Money" by Robert Britt, argues that time can and will bring you more happiness that money in the long term.I disagree with Britt's argument because with money you can buy time and even possibly happiness. Britt argues that the user has to choose between the to money or happiness The reader may have money but also time as well. He is trying to change the readers mind about there life style goal.Britts placement of his purpose is great by leaving his purpose until the 3 paragraph he is able to let the reader read and understand his points building his credibility. By doing this a reader who may of left because of his strong opinion may still continue reading.Britts framing is very reasonable and organized greatly. His point was pushed across with a great amount of information no more needed or info taken away.His information is simple and too the point allowing the right amount of information to get the reader thinking about his point and even persuading them or making them to go and research more informationThe central argument in Britt’s article is that making decisions focused on time and meaning, will make your life much more impactful and happier than if you were to make decisions on what will make you money he stresses that having meaningful, well valued time, is so much more crucial than making money. he provides answers like this one that makes the reader really think on what they are doing and what there decisions are in life. I value both equally possibly money more than time as money can buy you time. What if you dont even have to work for your money you just have it it was granted to you or you put it into a business which you get profits from but don;t have to participate in running it. Then your money has given you a happy life but also time to do all you want.i would personally be comfortable with a job where you could earn more money based or your merits or advancements. 100,000 a year would be lovely. This would allow for trips, extra hobbies, and even life crisises.

Luke Murphy

1. Throughout "Time can make you happier than money," Brit argues that time and experiences are more important than having money. I agree with this because in my life I recall having a good time way more than I do spending my money on things. I believe that the two exerts are compaitable because time and meaning can go hand in hand. The meaning behind the times we have are well more important than the moeny we have in life or how we spend it.
2. I believe him adding the real purpose at the end strengthns his claim that time is more valuable than money because after he gives you all the facts and studys he applies his opinon into the essay and allows the reader to form their own opinon.
3. I believe Britts information from the studys stregnthens his claim because it provides proof of how much more benefitial time and experiences can be to a person than money. I do believe if Britt would have shortend some of his evidence it could've made the overall essay more powerful in its meaning by not boring the reader with facts about the brain.
4. I feel as though time is more valued than money, I'm not saying that all people should be poor to experience the true meaning of life but I am saying that life shouldn't be about what you have and don't have, it should be about how you lived it and the people you met along the way. I think anywhere between $50,000-$100,000 will give you a true experience in life and give you engough money to pay the bills and go out to eat every now and then but not be too much money to where you can overspend and spoil yourself.

Ariana Padilla

1. In "Time Can Make You Happier Than Money" by Robert Roy Britt, Britt argues that humans who value time more than money are happier and more satisfied with life. Britt also has two assertions: meaning vs. money and time vs. money. Both go hand in hand. Ashley Whillans, an assistant professor at Harvard Business School, even expresses "People who value time make decisions based on meaning versus money. They choose to do things because they want to, not because they have to." Time contributes to meaningfulness because the more time a person has,less stress is put on the individual.If a person feels rushed, they will feel they "have" to do a certain thing and won't do it in their favor. I agree with Britt's argument, because I feel time truly does make the average person more content rather than money.

2. Throughout the essay, Britt is reporting information from studies, but towards the final three paragraphs switches to giving advice and advocating for calls to action. I feel as though nothing is wrong with this, throughout the essay the reader can easily pickup the message and meaning of the essay, which is time brings more joy than money. Also, stating his calls to action and advice at the end gives more of an impact. It makes the reader intrigued, and does not make them stray from the true meaning of what Britt is trying to pose.

3. Britt provides hyperlinks throughout the essay, while framing information ab the studies. Britt's framing is effective. He provided just enough information for the reader to understand, but not so much as to where it was overpowering and the reader would get bored. It makes the reader also take the time to thoroughly understand the concept of the studies and what they have to do with the argument of time vs. money.

4. Britt poses the argument of time vs. money as an either-or matter. A person either values time or money more. I value time more than money. If i were to be able to buy time though, I'm not sure I would do it. Either way you are spending money. Some things I like to do myself too, rather than have another person do it for me. For me to feel like I have "enough" money I would say I'd have to earn around 30k each year. Society pressures you into thinking money is more important than anything else, but that really is not the case. You can live a simple, cheap lifestyle while still being happy.

Erwin

I would prefer time over money as I can use my time to make more money.

Bleachedchickenugget (Alyssa)

1) In the article “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money,” the author Robert Roy Britt makes some pretty valid points in his essay about time and meaning. He states that...“people who value time make decisions based on meaning versus money,”
This quote was well said by study leader Ashley Whillans, an assistant professor of business administration at Harvard Business School. “They choose to do things because they want to, not because they have to.” In similarity to what Ashley Whillans states, is that you can make time and it really all depends on how much it means to them. Britt also claims how people who value time over money tend to be happier, according to multiple studies. While this may be true, it is difficult for some people to choose time over money. In comparison to time over money matters, Britt states “money doesn't buy happiness.” he argues that people who value time over money are more likely to “pursue things they enjoy, including hobbies, social relationships, internships, and careers that provide intrinsic satisfaction rather than merely seeking compensation, the study suggests.” All of his reasonings behind time over money are factual in being happier in life instead of just focusing on money without making time for leisure. On the other hand, some people may say that money is much more valued over time, in which some cases some people value raking in loads of money instead of making time to relax but, in spite of making money, having a social life and pursuing opportunities you want to clearly outweigh the benefits of valuing money over time. In my opinion, people choose to value certain objects of matter. Despite working for your beneficial salary and necessities, you can also make time for subjects you enjoy. Britt’s main argument is that people who value time more often can make you much more happier. I agree with Britt because although money can buy you happiness to a certain extent or a short period of time with luxurious objects/brands, you have to make time for leisure otherwise, valuing money over time is irrelevant. People choose to value what they please, but at the end of the day everybody wants to be happy.

yayaaa

While reading this article that explains how time makes you happier than money, I came across a few interesting points that made me wonder whether my opinion will change or not. For example, “researchers found that valuing time over money brought double the magnitude of happiness related to materialism in general and happiness known to accrue from high parental income”. This research has a very good point and made me wonder about valuing time over valuing money. In order to do many things you need to have money to spend. In certain situations, having a lot of money can be stressful and difficult to handle, just like not having money is also very stressful to live with. On the contrary, the thing about money is that you can basically get anything you want, need or desire to have. You can have all the time in the world, but if you don't have money you may not feel as happy as you would be if you had the money to spend on enjoying your time. Having a lot of time in your hands does not necessarily mean that you have something to do during all that time. In my opinion, when there is money to spend, it is so much easier to enjoy the time that you have. In some cases yes, time can feel more valuable to you than the money, but it will always have to play a factor in your happiness no matter how much time in the world you may have to enjoy.

saleh alnumairi

The author Robert Britt argued about the value of time vs money. Britt used facts to deliver his point which is whoever values time is happier. Some people value money but as they age they tend to change their mindset. No one knows what is the value of money. Once an old man told me “stop chasing money, the money will chase you when you stop chasing it”. I have valued money more than anything in this world but I came to one conclusion which is money isn’t worth anything. No matter how much I had, it went away anyway, it was spent one way or another. My view of time has changed, time is the only thing I can’t get back. A second passed without an achievement equal to a year of regrets. Since I started to value my time, time became an important factor in my life, which can be used to help me make money, do work and have fun with other people such as family and friends. I agree with the title, time can make anyone happier. Moreover, money can buy you a lot of stuff and could give anyone the ability to explore the world, but there are things that money cannot buy such as family, friends or health.

Britt argued that time is much more valuable than money, some people tend to disagree they believe that money can buy happiness. I believe that time is the key to happiness. I agreed with the Britt; he delivered his point and made sure that every reader gets to pick aside. I think that time is valued depending on who is looking at it. I also believe that money can't help anyone more than time can. As well as I agree with Erwin, time is valuable and can be used to make money. Time could be used in many ways but what is important is who could use our time to serve our best interests. Time can be used to do anything one can think of, or want to do.

Sophia Bond

1. In "Time Can Make You Happier Than Money," by Robert Roy Britt, Britt claims that people who value time over money are more satisfied with their life. Later in the article, Britt creates two assertions: meaning vs. money and time vs. money. The two assertions are compatible. Ashely Whillians, an assistant professor at Harvard Business School, supports Britt's assertions and states that "People who value time make decisions based on meaning versus money. They make decisions because they want to, not because they have to." Time impacts meaningfulness because the more time someone has to spend on something changes the activity from a need to a want. I agree with Britt's argument because having time to do the things you enjoy makes people more satisfied with life than money does because with money, you never have to work towards anything. Everything is accessible to you.

2. Throughout the essay, Britt reports information to the readers, its not until the final three paragraphs that he shifts and gives his calls to actions. I don't think that he should have stated his real purpose earlier into the essay. Throughout the article, the readers pick up on his purpose. By waiting till the end his claims are more impactful. If his claim, time leads to more happiness than money, was stated in the beginning of the article the readers would have no reason to read the article because as soon as they would start reading, they would either support or oppose his claim.

3. Britt provides hyperlinks to the research studies that are in his They Say blog, he offers brief framing information about the studies. Britt's framing is effective. He is able to give brief synopses's of the research studies. Britt provides just enough information to inform the readers, not enough to distract the reader from his claims. "A 2016 study of 4,000 U.S. adults found that people who valued time more than money were 'happier and more satisfied with life than other people who chose money,' even after the researchers accounted for differences in age, income, and the amount of time people spent at work or at leisure..." Britt includes enough facts about the research to prove that it's a credible source, but not enough to bore readers with information.

4. Throughout the article, Britt creates the argument time vs. money as an either-or matter. I value time more than money. However, I still recognize the value of money. Growing up, living paycheck to paycheck with my mom, money was a very important factor in our life. If I were able to buy time, I probably would't because either way, you're spending money on time. I'd rather do things for myself instead of paying someone else to do it for me. To have "enough" money to support me would probably be around $35-40K a year. It's easy to live a simplistic lifestyle and still have time for leisurely activities.

Sai H

I agree that those who value time over money are happier in life because they are not endlessly fixed on, and stressing about numbers, but instead are focused on what they want in life and living it in the moment. For example, recent graduates of the University of British Columbia were surveyed, 62% out of 1,000 students said they chose time over money and were happier. Britt backs up his viewpoint by transitioning into research conducted on adults. Britt talked about a 2016 study that proved people who valued more time opposed to money, were “happier and more satisfied with life than people who chose money.” Although money is a pivotal factor in life and having abundances of it can in turn enable happiness, I think it is pointless and debilitating to be constantly fixated on others or on numbers. The author acknowledges that money has the potential to buy happiness, however, only up to a certain point. To worry or stress oneself about how much money another makes or how many luxurious things they may have when you can enjoy your time doing things you have and love. We should value the time we have to fill our lives with fond memories, rather than thoughts of greed or envy. Britt’s notion that an emphasis on time in a person’s mindset can bring them newfound joy and happiness that they did not have before. I believe the mindset of a society would need to change just as much as the individual in order for any significant impact to occur among the masses anywhere in the world today. Once achieved however, I believe the pursuit of happiness, as opposed to the pursuit of cash would have immensely positive results on the mass majority of people and could curve many of the mental health problems people all over the world are experiencing today. This is because money is finite. time however has no limit.

Johnny

The article post I read was called “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money”. This article has shown a lot of information about the psychological benefits the average person gets from having a good amount of time on your hands instead of constantly working. A majority of people in this world are choosing to overwork because many people assume that material possessions outweigh experiences in terms of happiness. Britt explains that people whose decisions are influenced based on the meaning of an experience rather than money are going to have a higher chance to pursue things they enjoy, which will ultimately lead to happiness in the long term of things because you're doing something you genuinely enjoy. This later leads off into Britts statement when he says invest in experiences rather than materialistic things can lead to a happier existence for an individual. I agree with Britt’s notion that an emphasis on time in a person’s mindset can bring them newfound joy and happiness that they did not have before. He supports his argument by first using a study that concluded 62% out of 1000 students said they chose time over money and were happier. Although I understand how having money could make someone happy in the moment, money is something that may not always bring constant happiness.Britt puts forth multiple statistics that show that the higher percentage of people believe that time is much more valuable than money.

Britney Rowe


In “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money”, by Robert Roy Britt, the essay claims that people who value time over money are generally more content with life. Robert Britt formulates two assertions in his essay, time vs. money and meaning vs. money. The two assertions Britt expressed are compatible. Time contributes to meaningfulness, according to Ashley Whillians, an assistant professor at Harvard Business School, she supports Robert Roy Britt’s claim and convey’s “People who value time make decisions, based on meaning versus money. They make decisions because they want to, not because they have to.” People who are materialistic realize that in America, time equals money, so this statement reveals that people who value time make decisions based on what is meaningful to them as an individual, rather than basing their time on materialistic reasons. I agree with Britt’s argument, because life should be quality, not quantity. In the article it states “In both surveys, about 62% of them said they value time more than money, and those people were happier.” This shows that valuing time over money allows people to be able to be happier than people who value money over time.


Throughout the essay, Robert Britt is reporting information from studies into his essay. it is not until the final three paragraphs that he shifts transitioning announcing his calls to actions. He should not have stated the real purpose towards the end vs. the beginning, because knowing this information prior to the end of the sentence enables the reader to fully comprehend the meaning of the essay. Even though readers are able to easily comprehend the meaning and messages, it would be beneficial to put the purpose at the beginning so the reader can get a full understanding. While stating the calls to action at the end of the essay, makes reading the essay like a journey, putting them towards the beginning will allow the reader to focus more on the main topic at hand rather than trying to find the missing clue that would link one paragraph to the next.

Robert Roy Britt provides hyperlinks throughout the entire essay, he offers very brief but effective framing information about the studies. He provided the perfect amount of information, it was just enough to keep the readers informed and still focused on the claim. A scientific study was created “A 2016 study of 4,000 U.S. adults found that people who valued time more than money were ‘happier and more satisfied with life than other people who chose money,’ even after the researchers accounted for differences in age, income, and the amount of time people spend at work or at leisure…” This quote from Robert Britt is a very credible source because of all the information he displays. This is also will not be enough information to bore the readers, it is a perfect harmony of information allowing the essay to be considered perfect.


Robert Roy Britt is fabricating the argument of time vs. money as an either-or matter. The argument states that a person can either value time or money more. The article is trying to persuade readers to valuing time over money. The article also makes the reader aware that money still has value. 90,000 dollars in salary a year, has been the average amount of money that allows people to still become happy. Any more than that people are generally less satisfied in life, “People making about $95,000...further increases in income tended to be associated with reduced life satisfaction.” Society will pressure people into thinking money is more important than time or meaning. However society is incorrect, a person is able to live a simple life and remain happy, without the weight and pressure money brings upon itself.

Mac

In Robert Roy Britt's "Time can make you happier than money", Roy delves into the age old question if it is more important to value your time or value materialistic items and money. The first half of the article depicts a research conducted at the University of British Columbia graduates. The results of the study stated that the students valued time and were typically happier than their peers who valued money. The second half of the article states how money can buy temporary happiness, but in the long run, time is still more important and can be a better stress reducer to volunteer and give your time. The two points in his two part essay put time and money against each other, and meaning versus money. Britt states that although money does have an impact on peoples lives, Time should be valued more as it gives your life a sense of meaning, as well as giving yourself the illusion that individuals fell as if they have more time rather than having a "famine of time". I agree with Britt's argument as giving your life a purpose focused on living your life to the fullest is more important than getting materialistic items, or stressing about bills.

1.These two assertions are compatible as meaning can affect the sense of time, such as the illusion that time moves faster when one is having fun. Putting Time and meaning against money makes logical sense as money is often depicted as being an either or option such as choosing relationships or careers. Time contributes to meaningfulness rather than money because the concept of time is directly effected by how an individual perceives the times meaning and how important that time was. Money is seen as less meaningful when not comparing the materialistic value. I agree with Britt's argument as spending time with family, or traveling is a better stress reliever than any amount of TV will ever be.

2. I do not believe he should have put his reasoning in the beginning of the article as the factual evidence is meant to first sway the reader towards his argument, and the advice and reasoning is meant to put the final nail in the coffin for the reader and sway them.

3. Britt's framing is effective, but could use more information as in the article the author himself states that the information could be flawed as it was taken from one college in Canada, rather than from several colleges in the US and Canada. The author should have used more information as he only used two studies with one study being based off of older studies which may have contained dated information.

4. I personally value money over time with an overall 75/25 split. This is a direct result of wanting to "buy time" which means that while I am young I work for money, so later I can focus on time. I am more than willing to "buy time" or time saving devices. I would feel comfortable with 6 figures, but I could make do with anything over 70 a year.

Alexis Nesbitt

1. Britt frames the opposition as time vs. money; at other points, he states the opposition as one of meaning vs. money. These two assertions are compatible because they go hand in hand when building an argument against why time or anything dealing with time is better than making money. Time contributes to meaningfulness because it allows people to do things that they enjoy and that bring them happiness but money does not because it brings people worry and stress and not a lot of people want to have to go through that. Britt’s argument is that people would choose to have more time because then they get to do more things and it bring people happiness than having more money because money only gives you materialistic things and wouldn't bring you as much comfort. I agree because in my own experience I prefer to have more time than money because having time makes me much happier.
2. Throughout most of the essay, Britt is reporting information—results of various studies—in a factual manner. Only in the final three paragraphs does he shift gears and end by giving advice and advocating specific courses of action.I think what he has done is a very good choice because instead of just giving the audience his big idea, he builds around it and gives us information about it making us become more interested and wanting to read more. So I think that waiting until the end was a very good choice.
3.Britt provides hyperlinks to the research studies that are his They Say, and he offers brief framing information about the studies. Britt’s framing is very effective. He could have maybe provided more information to be more details.
4. Britt presents the issue as largely an either-or matter: you either value money or you value time, one side or the other. Clearly, life is seldom this simple; it’s more likely a matter of proportions as well as circumstances and timing, since expenses that are large or unexpected (or both!) can throw off anyone’s equilibrium. I value both but time more than I do money. I would be very willing to buy time. I would need to earn at least 90,000 a year to feel like I have "enough" money. I would need to make that much because as a person I have expensive taste and I know that I would want more. So I know that I would have to work to get that amount of money while still managing to have time.

Kaitlyn Riley

1) In the article “Time Can Make You Happier Than Money” By Robert Roy Britt, he argues that time holds more value and brings one more happiness than money can. Stating that people who value their time over money tend to pursue things in their lives that make them happier. Britt writes about time vs money as well as meaning vs money. Both these assertions are compatible because with time and meaning they both hold value, and Britt throughout is comparing value to money. Time holds value and contributes to meaningfulness because time is something one can never get back. Time never stops and we only have so much. It is important that people cherish their time and Britt argues that when people spend their money to buy time or do productive things with their time, they are happier and have less stress. Money does not contribute to meaningfulness because money can only buy you materialistic things that do not fulfill someone’s happiness. Money cannot bring the joy and memories that time and real-life experiences do. I agree with Britt and his argument that time holds value and meaningfulness and money does not. You can not buy life experiences and happiness with family and friends. I know that I would much rather be with the people I love than having the newest phone or expensive clothes.
2) The way that Britt structured his argument by stating factual evidence supported by various studies in the beginning, and then giving advice with a call to action at the end was a good format. I believe that he did the correct thing of waiting until the end to reveal his true purpose and give his call to action because it perfectly wraps up his story and message. Britt was able to make an argument and defend it with evidence in the beginning, and then when it came to the end he was able to give his personal insight and leave his audience on a good note of a call to action. If he were to do it, in the beginning, the audience would have forgotten it by the end and it would not have had as an impactful effect. He left the most important part for the ending so it would resonate with his audience.
3) Throughout Britt’s argument, he provides links to research studies and offers brief fragmentation about the studies. This framing is effective because by adding a brief description of his evidence he is not overpowering the reader with information and is able to back up his argument in a simple way that his audience will understand. His evidence is simple enough to understand while still supporting his claim. For example, Britt provides evidence such as “In both surveys, about 62% of them said they value time more than money, and those people were happier.”, “ ...and the researchers found that valuing time over money brought double the magnitude of happiness related to materialism in general and happiness known to accrue from high parental income.”
4) Personally, I value my time way more than the money I have in my bank account, and in a proportion, it would be about 75% time and 25% money. Although money is not the most important thing and I am usually not one to care much about materialistic things, money is still important. I do have a job and I do care about how much money I make, but only because I use 85% of my money on life experiences and things that better my time. For example spending money on plane tickets, dinner with friends, etc. Time holds more value than money but it still is important to be able to support yourself and be able to do things that make you happy. I would be willing to spend my money on things that would buy me time, however, I do enjoy doing most tasks that take up time in my day. Sometimes it is nice to stay home and clean, but maybe that is just my unpopular opinion. As a teenager living with my parents I do not need a large amount of money to be enough, but I’d say about $2,000 a year.

Keegan Carroll

1. In the article "Time Can Make You Happier Than Money," by Robert Roy Britt, he argues and says that having time over money will be more important and make you happier in life. He also makes a view that people who value time also view that they also view that meaning is more important time. Both of these claims are compatible with each-other, and many people other than the author believe that to. A British Colombia professor and colleague say that people value time over money, and the one that said yes led happier lives. She calls a certain disease the "famine of time", and Whillan says," The sense of "having enough time" is at an all time low." I agree with them because it should be quality over quantity. Being able to have the time to do what you want freely will reduce stress, then if you have to squeeze that time in a tight work budget.
2. Throughout the article he states facts and research studies, and does not offer advice until the last three paragraphs. Britt should not have put the advice earlier in the article, because it helps the impact of the article on the reader. The bulk of the article is him supporting the claim and make the argument grow on the reader. By giving advice at the end he is allowing his claim to make the biggest impact to the reader, rather than it being less impactful at the end of the article.
3. Britt provides the hyperlinks in his They Say article, which provide information of the specific studies he wrote about. By putting these hyper links in his essay, he is allowing the reader to trust him more and more till he captures them into believing in what he is writing about. The hyper links are strengthening his claim, and making it even more impactful to the reader. by using specific example such as the studies about income it strengthens his argument much more than if it was just said. By allowing the reader to read what the writer is talking about, makes them see a more familiar understanding it the specific studies, and hw it correlates to the authors claim.
4. I value the time you have with other humans over how much money you have. While making a fortune has its countless advantages, I would rather work an average paying job with more social interactions in and out of work, rather than work a high paying job barely having any time to do anything social. Spending money on "time" should be used only when you are on the brink of stress or have not had a pleasurable moment in a while. Nobody should spend more than 100 dollars to buy some time for yourself or you with your family and friends.

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