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03/27/2018

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Kaylee Biesemeier

1. Food insecurity really affects students physical health. Many students who attend college are on a no-loan financial aid policy. So when these students are on break and the cafeterias shut down; they have no money to get food. This causes students to not even be able to afford to go home, let alone their own food. So, these students will have to pick up some extra work around campus just to get the necessity of food.
2.I think Jack added a great touch to this article by explaining that he experienced food insecurity. It makes the article more deep because he can actually empathize with these other students. I think this article would not be the same if he didn't add this touch in because it adds way more character. He isn't just someone looking from the outside, he was actually there having to deal with food insecurity.
3. Jack quoted many students who are dealing with food insecurities, but I wouldn't say that he quoted them in the best format possible. After reading chapter 3 from "They Say, I Say," and then looking back at Jack's quotes; I realized he could've formed the quotations a little bit better so that the article would look more sophisticated and educated. Instead of just saying the specific person's name and then following the quote, he could have said "X states", "According to X", or even "X agrees when she said." These templates for introducing quotations sound way more professional and look better too!
4. I think the responsibility for this food insecurity among college students has to deal with the initiatives and policies of the different colleges and universities. This widespread phenomena has nothing to do with the students. These students are enrolled into college and should be able to get food all year round. Food is a main source of brain fuel. These students who are not getting any food are becoming academically challenges. According to Jack, "Hunger in the midst of plenty weakens students’ sense of belonging and undercuts their social, emotional and physical well-being." That smacks you right in the face, these poor students are going in a negative downward spiral all because of this food insecurity. In his journal, Jack maintains that "A more recent George Washington University survey revealed that one in five first-generation college students reported being “food insecure” three or more times a week." That is startling and that includes a big body of students. It is time to end these food securities and let's keep the cafeteria all year round.

Christy Carden

Food insecurity affects more than just the students on campus and much more of the time than only during Spring Break. I personally as a non-traditional student living off campus with children who were traditional college sturdents simultaneously found myself visiting the food pantry at the University many times.
Some of the obstacles caused by food insecurity are not simply lack of proper nutrition. They are much more complex and not recovered from once proper nutrition is restored. For example, try concentrating on studying for final exams with the constant worry of how you will manage to feed yourself and your children while keeping the lights on for the next week.
This stress is compounded by knowing if you don't do well on the exams your GPA drops which results in less financial aid, and more debt.
Financial aid does not go far in covering meals on campus as all students know, because the prices are excessive compared to level of nutrition.

Janice G

The other issue discussed in this article, written by Anthony Jack, involve money and social classes. While the articles main debate is the health concern amongst students during spring break it also proposes the idea of those who are unwealthy starving, stealing, or going through pain through this break. The article provides evidence of a student stealing food the day the cafeteria's closed. “…I took a bunch of bread and things that are not perishable.” The insecurity in being able to afford the next meal, especially at the esteemed universities discussed, brings a new stress factor to a minority of students. “These changes would allow students to focus energy and time on academics instead of strategizing about ways to secure food.” The programs trying to be implemented would allow those who are unwealthy to continue their academic career.

Jahaida G

1.Food insecurities are abig issue and don't allow students to be able to purchase food when campus is closed which students struggle because some depend on the free meals or reduced emals provided.

2.Jack included his own experience because he feels if students can relate maybe he feels a movement can be made. I feel the article would not be the same if he didn't bring a personal touch which brings how he includes the E.P.L.
3.For the They Say, Jack draws brief quotations from students but I feel that he included a good amount of info but based on Chapter 3 he could of included more of what the templates examples that are given be included in his quotations.

4.I feel the responsibility does not lay with the students since the purpose many students attend school is to get a career to have a better living rather then the current living situation that they encounter. I feel the responsibility should lay on the schools and government because I feel students are entitled to have at least 1 hot meal to keep them going and to help them focus more in school and have a higher success rate. I think government programs should be providing these programs for students of all backgrounds because we want people to succeed. I feel personally from my experience coming from a single mother having to grow up eating in the streets digging thru garbage that some sort of program should not only exist in schools but communities of more low income families live at. I believe that if these programs existed many more students would graduate and we would have a lower drop rate and even maybe a lower crime rate with one simple but drastic change for the better.

malik alexander

I think that food insecurity is a really big issue in colleges and can affects students physical health and mental . alot of college students who rely on parent funding financial aid or are on a no-loan financial aid agreement which doesnt provide them with funds. when the schools are on break and the cafeterias shut down; they have no money or way to get food. Which result in students will having to pick up some extra work around campus or a job which in school just to eat.I think Jack gave great support to his claim of lack of food for students when explaining that he experienced food insecurity. It supports the article because he can actually empathize with these other students ans proves that we is a credible speaker.To be honest i believe the only people responsable for making sure student have food all year round and are always feed while on campus in the school and univerities. We all the money we already have to pay and with all the student loans and aid that may or may not be given i the think school should have to ensure food and service to students tht alraedy pay so much just to go to school.

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